Posts Tagged ‘ “US government monitors social media” ’

List of Words Homeland Security Tracks on Facebook and Twitter

Well here you have it. This is the list of words being used by our government to single us out and label us as “terrorists”. Once they have enough on the list, I’m sure they will begin opening the FEMA camps and rounding us up like cattle.

Noel Brinkerhoff, David Wallechinsky
All Gov
March 5, 2012

If not getting enough attention in your life is a problem, there’s one surefire way to get the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to notice you: Use any of its proscribed watch words on social media sites.

According to a DHS document, the agency is maintaining a lengthy list of “Items of Interest”—in other words, words. The words are categorized by subject, such as those falling under “Domestic Security,” “Southwest Border Violence,” “Health Concern + H1N1,” “Terrorism” and more. Facebook Big Brother

Besides the obvious ones like “Al Qaeda (all spellings),” “weapons cache,” “meth lab” and “jihad,” the words being monitored on Facebook and Twitter include:

·       airport
·       sick
·       gas
·       cloud
·       mud slide or mudslide
·       canceled
·       interstate
·       recovery
·       home grown
·       marijuana
·       incident
·       police
·       infection
·       symptoms
·       North Korea
·       China
·       Tucson
·       San Diego
·       pork
·       help
and, of course,
·       social media

To Learn More:
The Department of Homeland Security Is Searching Your Facebook and Twitter for These Words (by Joel Johnson, Animal New York)
Analyst’s Desktop Binder (Department of Homeland Security) (pdf)

Source

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FEMA Follows DHS In Monitoring News Coverage Of Its Activities 24/7

Here we go again; now FEMA wants to know what people are saying about them and they are resorting to the same tactics being used by the Department of Homeland Security. It reminds me of this commercial I see on TV that makes me laugh “Who’s searching for you?”.

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars
Friday, February 17, 2012

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has followed in the footsteps of the DHS in looking to hire a private contractor that will monitor news coverage of the agency’s activities on a 24/7 basis.

“FEMA is planning to award a 100% small business set-aside contract to a media monitoring firm that can monitor, archive and measure all local news in “major Nielsen markets,” all nationally broadcast news and all cable outlets for their news coverage of FEMA activities in the field across the U.S.,” reports Government Security News.

The program is similar in nature to a Department of Homeland Security monitoring effort that stoked controversy and a congressional hearing after it emerged that the DHS had hired an outside contractor, General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, to monitor social media outlets along with a list of websites, on a “24/7/365 basis,” in order to uncover “any media reports that reflect adversely on the U.S. Government and the Department.”

This included monitoring remarks by residents of Standish, Michigan in “newspaper comment talkbacks, local blogs, Twitter posts, and publicly available Facebook posts,” to gage the response to a plan to bring Guantanamo Bay detainees to a local prison.

Although the FEMA contract does not specifically mention the monitoring of blogs and comments made by Internet users, it does call for the program to “Monitor the effectiveness of public affairs messaging,” which implies that feedback from citizens regarding FEMA’s activities will be part of the process.

The FEMA contract for the monitoring service explains that the agency is looking for information on “media statistics including the audience exposure and publicity value” for news items related to FEMA.

Concerned about its reputation in the eyes of American citizens who are growing increasingly wary of big government, this is not the first time FEMA has reached out to try and massage its image following the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, which “evoked some of the harshest criticism the agency has ever faced.”

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